Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘novels’

I’m in Week 3 of our self-imposed lockdown, traveling outside the home only for groceries and medications.

Even for an introvert like me, it’s been difficult. I miss the occasional dinner out, game nights across the street, and impromptu chats in the cul-de-sac. For y’all, I’m sure it’s the same, or worse if you’re more extroverted, as you struggle with being cut off from your usual activities whilst being faced with the new requirements that come with having everyone at home 24×7.

There’s not much I can do for you directly, but what I can do is this: I can try to help you pass the time and stay the F*** home.

To that end, I am offering my books for free on Kindle. You don’t need the reader; you just need the app. It’s available for free, for PC, Mac, and all smart phones.

The first two titles (below) will be free this Wednesday thru Sunday (March 25–29). Other titles will be offered free-of-charge at future dates. My intention is to roll through all of my titles, switching between them every two weeks or so.

Feel free to share this information with your friends and family.

Unraveling Time
https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B0052855B4

Dreams of the Desert Wind
https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B005455E7K

Keep checking in for updates and future titles.

k

Read Full Post »

Bath Abbey Fan VaultingSometimes, the word “interesting” isn’t enough.

This weekend past, as well as being sad, stressful, productive, lazy, and maddening, was also interesting.

It was the 31st anniversary of my wedding. It was the yahrzeit of the death of my wife’s mother. It was a weekend of plans, and of disrupted plans. It was a weekend with three reservations to the same restaurant, each one made and canceled in daily succession. It was a weekend of editing, rereading and rewriting my latest short story (“The Book of Solomon”), proofing it, polishing it, and then sending it off to a paying market.

It was also the weekend when I got an email from the Senior Librarian in Sumner, WA, asking if I’d be interested in participating in a panel, this October.

Yeah, “interesting” doesn’t really cover it.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Over on Facebook, a reader mentioned a scene in FC:1 that she really liked. I like to investigate this sort of specific feedback–the good and the bad–to see what worked and what didn’t work for my readers.

I remembered the scene she mentioned in general, but not in detail. The main reason I wanted to investigate, though, was that her description of it as dialogue-free was not my recollection; I remembered it as being chatty to the extreme, as two swoony teenaged girls prattled on about how divine it was going to be to see Sarah Bernhardt on stage. (For those of you out of the 19th-century loop, Sarah Bernhardt was the Lady Gaga of her day.)

So, I pulled down my copy of The Year the Cloud Fell and tried to figure out what this reader had meant when she referred to the scene’s “shared communication and not a scrap of dialogue.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

In retrospect, yesterday’s post was a bad idea and very out of character. I had misgivings and hesitated before posting, but I ascribed those feelings to being “brave” and maybe even a bit “edgy” with my choice of topic.

Nope. Instead, it came across as a petulant, whinge-filled pity-fest served with a big side of “Buy my book and tell me it’s grand.”

Ew…and therefore…my apologies. That was not what I wanted to say, and that is not what I want this blog to be about.

Here’s what I want to say, instead. (more…)

Read Full Post »

I’m biased. There. I said it.

I’m biased, in that I like the books I’ve written. I can’t help it. Frankly, I wouldn’t be able to get through the writing part of being a novelist without liking the books I write. Writing a book I didn’t like? Not gonna happen.

So, I’m biased, and that’s unfortunate, because it makes it impossible for me to understand why Unraveling Time didn’t sell.

And I want to know.

Seriously. I want to have an honest, open conversation about why this book didn’t sell. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Kurt R.A. Giambastiani

I’m always curious, when readers leave comments about my books, as to which of my novels is their favorite and why.

The answers are always varied. Sometimes it’s the subject matter, the period, or the setting. For others, it’s the characters who populate the pages. Occasionally, it’s just je ne sais quoi, that certain “something” that resonates with a particular reader.

Recently, though, the question was turned around; someone asked me what my favorite was. (more…)

Read Full Post »

You all know I’m a Browncoat and a fan of “Castle,” as well. I may have also mentioned that one of my guilty pleasures is reading the “Richard Castle Mysteries,” the series of novels ghost written under the Richard Castle nom de plume.

I’m generally not a fan of mystery novels. I find them too formulaic and (frankly) unbelievable. I admit, I went through a Nero Wolfe phase in my youth, scarfing up every dog-eared Rex Stout paperback I could find, but I recovered. These days, the only ones I can read are police procedurals because, let’s face it, who’s more likely to come into contact with murders and murderers time after time: an old pensioner from Sussex, or a homicide detective?

I’ve read all the Nikki Heat books, and am reading Deadly Heat now. Part of my enjoyment of these books is the conceit; I’m reading a book “written” by a fictional character, a book that is mentioned in the TV series, and which often debuts on bookshelves on the same night it debuts on the television show. The book mimics action played out during the previous season in the TV show, as if it were really the product of this fictional character’s fictional life. And built within the book are characters and references to events that appear in the television show. It’s a wonderful gimmick that I really enjoy. Now, throw in a handful of “self-awareness” references, such as acknowledgments that thank not only characters from the show, but also (by first name only) actors who portray those characters. And then, to top it off, toss in a handful of really “meta”  references, pointing back to “Firefly” and other works the actors have done outside the “Castle” world.

In all, it’s layers upon layers, fiction upon fiction, all with a wink and a nod to the real world and real life. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: